African Rooibos

Rooibos dress from Colette Patterns

Rooibos dress from Colette Patterns

My idea of slow sewing certainly didn’t include stopping sewing altogether, but during the last two months, that’s exactly what happened! I will get back to the self drafted trousers etc, but in the meantime, I have been able to sew again, and this is the first project I’ve finished! I definitely wanted to enter The Monthly Stitch’s Indie Pattern Month again this year, so that was part of the motivation. Also, I was getting really bored of not sewing.

DSC09973-1You’d have thought while I was unable to sew that I’d be mindful of what I was doing online, but instead of living vicariously through everyone else’s sewing, all I wanted was to join in. So if you can’t sew, you shop, right?? I have added to my pattern stash, and the fabric stash is a fair bit bigger too. Ooops!

The first piece I bought was intended for this project. I had the Colette Patterns Rooibos dress pattern from last year, but had never managed to find something to make it in Not to mention that at the time daughter No2 had more than enough dresses in her wardrobe. Still does if the truth be told. But this was a match made in heaven. I chose an African wax print cotton from Fabric Godmother. I had thought of a Shweshwe fabric, but had already fallen in love.

Rooibos toile

Rooibos toile

Following many online disappointments and rants about the drafting of the patterns, I got a toile ready, with trepedation! Colette Patterns are supposed to be drafted for “curvy” shapes, but the measurements on the envelope (once I’d converted them to metric) were pretty close to daughter no2’s, except for the hip which was one size up, as always. I cut the 2, grading to the 4 from waist to hip in case she needed it. The shape of the skirt though showed I didn’t need that step, so I reverted to the 2 throughout.

Hmm, not exactly lining up!

Hmm, not exactly lining up!

I did have a couple of issues with the drafting. The front midriff piece was too long to fit the front bodice, but only on that joining seam – the skirt pieces fitted the bottom seam of the midriff perfectly… You can see the little folded away bit in this photo of the toile. So I cut the centre front accordingly.

Pleated out section in front midriff piece

Pleated out section in front midriff piece

Extended back darts

Extended back darts

The other blip was the length of the back darts. They are wide and very short, resulting in “back boobs”!!! So not a good look. I lengthened the darts to 7cm so they finished just below the shoulder blades, and the fit was greatly improved. After trying on the toile, daughter no 2 decided the length as it was was perfect for her, which meant adding 3cm to the bottom so I could actually turn up a hem. And that was all I needed to do to the pattern! Thank goodness, because I had read many posts of despair from sewists using various Colette Patterns.

Completed toile.

Completed toile.

DSC09970-1The fabric was a breeze to use, I’d tossed it into the washing machine as soon as postie had delivered it, ironed it and waited for the opportune moment to get cutting. Which means I waited for daughter no 2 to pin the pattern to the fabric – under my supervision – and manhandled my rotary cutter (left-handed) around all the pieces, trying not to cut into the pattern, and not go all wobbly. It worked out pretty well. The facings are interfaced with Gill Arnold’s fine sheer polyester fusible, the hem edge covered with a lovely chocolate brown seam tape and the seams finished with a simple zigzag. I was not ready to shift heavy sewing machinery around in order to use the overlocker, and sometimes I think the humble zigzag gets overlooked in favour of its more glamourous cousins.

DSC09972-1I really like the way the dress turned out. We eschewed piping and contrast pieces because the fabric was so beautifully printed and busy. No attempt was made to pattern match, I really wouldn’t have liked to have tried!! Now all we need is suitable summer dress weather so it can be worn, and not left languishing in the back of the wardrobe.

DSC09966-1

This then, is my entry for the Monthly Stitch’s Indie Pattern Month 2015 Dresses Contest, which runs this week.

ps, I have to add a bit here, kudos to all left handed sewists out there, during my enforced time as a left handed sewing machinery operator I have found it really cumbersome. Everything is set up for the right handed of us. Well done people, hats off to you!!

11 thoughts on “African Rooibos

  1. Stunning, all that time fussing with the toile alterations will be worth it in that you’ve perfected the pattern for your future use. I adore big tribal prints and this one is spectacular – well done, and thanks for such an interesting blog post!

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  2. Excellent result! Working through fitting the muslin made for the perfectly fitting dress. Is really cute! I have that pattern and was thinking about making it for my daughter.
    P.S. I’m left-handed and cherish my left-handed scissors and my left-handed rotary cutter. I often wonder what it would be like if the sewing machine faced the other way.

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